Read + Review — The Rule of Thoughts by James Dashner

The Rule of Thoughts by James Dashner

In this book, The Rule of Thoughts, Michael Peterson is facing problems. In the previous book, he was just a Tangent, a computer program in an advanced game, made to think that he was a real human. He learns the truth, which changes everything he ever knew. All of his reality was nothing but strings of code. Later, after the Mortality Doctrine was used on him by Kaine, his nemesis, he wakes up in an unfamiliar home, in a strange place, in a reality of which he did not know, but that is the least of his problems. His Tangent life was downloaded into the mind of a human, resulting in dilemmas that he did not foresee. Now, he has no choice but to track down Kaine and get back what he wants.

Michael thought he was a good programmer until he met Kaine. Michael was an excellent hacker and good at coding, and he made friends with two others who shared his talents. Kaine, on the other hand, was a god in the Sleep, the computer world. He could control armies of monsters, change his appearance, and be in multiple places at once. However, he wants to become a human, in the same process that changed Michael. Yet, he still wants to live forever, and take over the VirtNet, the entire computer dimension. Michael and his friends have to stop him unless they want millions of human lives to be taken over by computer codes. Very few people are willing to help, and more questions are revealed at every turn. However, the biggest surprise is yet to come.

I found this book very entertaining and suspenseful. It kept me on the end of my seat, and made it very easy for me to visualize what was occurring throughout the book. I liked the author’s writing style and fluency. The characters were well described, and the plot was detailed and filled with many conflicts and situations. One factor I really liked about this book was how easy it was to jump into this book without reading the first one, The Eye of Minds. There was humor in the right places throughout this book. The one thing that I disliked was how the ending seemed too sudden, without explanation. I expected more, but it just promotes one to read this book’s sequel. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book, and I would recommend it to a friend.

Much of this book stuck out in my mind, but one particular part sticks out. This is how someday, the topics of this book may be similar to the future of humanity itself. Additionally, this could be a possible foretelling of the future that might reveal itself to be just as complex. This is inferred from how humanity evolves further with technology.

Reviewed by Shivram, Grade 7, Gayton Library
0-five-stars2

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